MLSG

Migrant Landbird Study Group

Promoting collaborative research for migratory landbirds across flyways

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Following up on the successful MLSG symposia at EOU conferences since 2015, we are ready for another dose of inspiring community-building preceding EOU2022 in Giessen, Germany, on March 12th -13th. The aim of the MLSG is to promote collaborative research to help advance flyway-scale understanding of and conservation actions for migrant landbirds. We believe knowledge-sharing is essential to achieve this. Thus, during our symposium we will actively engage all attendants to partake in a dynamic program of presentations, workshops, and group discussions. We will focus on data sharing and collaboration, new tracking technologies and priorities for migrant landbird research and conservation.

Join us and register here:
https://conference.eounion.org/2022/registration/

In our 3th webinar, Kaan Özgencil (MLSG outreach & social media) talked about functional responses to habitat degradation in waterbirds. Kaan’s work is based at the METU in Ankara, Turkey, and includes the monitoring of breeding waterbirds and conservation aspects in wetlands. In Turkey, many wetland habitats are decreasing due to human induced degradation and climate change, e.g. in the Konya Closed Basin, where agriculture changes from wheat production to sugar beet cultivation, temperatures are rising, salinity is increasing, and lakes are drying earlier in the season. These factors caused a decline in species richness of 20 % and  functional richness of 65 % within 20 years.

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The webinar was opened by Sandra Goded, MLSG international networker. She is working in Africa assessing the population status of migratory species in different habitats within protected and non-protected areas. She also presented her efforts and success in empowering local people to the monitoring and conservation of birds in Ghana throughout the year.

 We are working on developing a broad network between scientists, citizen-scientists, stakeholders, economists and have a specific interest in integrating underrepresented African and European countries. By involving people from all across the flyways we aim to bridge the conservation continuum from local solutions to global solutions and to formulate species action plans. By offering workshops and symposia during ornithological conferences we started to share our knowledge with a broader audience. Now, in these contact free times, we still want to connect globally and so we have set up the opportunity to attend virtual lectures and discussions on current research. Perhaps, you would like some feedback on your own research or to promote a new project? Let us know and we can give you the opportunity to speak up!

MLSG at “Migrant Birds as Indicators of Climate Change” conference, Gdańsk

From Dec 13th – 16th 2018 the Bird Migration Research Station (BMRS) from the University of Gdańsk, together with the Operation Baltic Foundation, hosted the international conference on “Migrant Birds as Indicators of Climate Change”. This event was part of a larger project, “Building an Early Warning System for Biodiversity in the Face of Climate Change”, jointly funded by the National Centre for Research and Development (Poland) and the National Research Foundation (South Africa), within a research cooperation agreement between the two countries. In total 65 participants from Poland, Holland, Denmark, France, Belgium, England and South Africa gathered in Hotel Orle in at Sobieszewo Island’s Baltic coast in southern Gdańsk.

foto1 2uczestnicy konferencji foto joel avni

13 - 16 December, Gdansk, Poland

A joint conference of the "Birds as Early Warning Systems" of the Poland–South Africa collaboration project, the Migrant Landbird Study Group, and the Polish Network of Bird Ringing Stations (KSSOP) - more info here

Deadline has been extended to 14 October!

More info and to sign up, see here

Point Blue Conservation Science is seeking one volunteer research assistant to work on Southeast Farallon Island, 30 miles west of San Francisco, California as part of a study examining the migratory movement of parulid warblers.

Insectivorous birds consume an estimated 400-500 million tons of prey annually
The Science of Nature
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00114-018-1571-z

By Martin Nyffeler, Çağan Şekercioğlu & Christopher Whelan

   For the first time, the predation impact of the insectivorous birds has been quantified on a global scale based on 103 (for the most part published) studies of prey consumption (kg per ha per season) of insectivorous birds in seven terrestrial biome types (i.e., tropical forests, temperate/boreal forests, tropical grasslands/savannas, temperate grasslands, croplands, deserts, and Arctic tundra).

Ten years tracking the migrations of small landbirds: Lessons learned in the golden age of bio-logging
The Auk Ornithological Advances
doi.org/10.1642/AUK-17-202.1

By Emily McKinnon and Oliver Love

Since miniature light-level geolocators were first deployed on small songbirds (2007), our understanding of migration for this group has grown exponentially. In this paper, 127 studies were reviewed that used geolocators to track small landbirds.

13 - 16 December, Gdansk, Poland

A joint conference of the "Birds as Early Warning Systems" of the Poland–South Africa collaboration project, the Migrant Landbird Study Group, and the Polish Network of Bird Ringing Stations (KSSOP) - more info here